The Best and Worst Foods for Your Thyroid

 
By 15 February 2018
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Is there a thyroid diet?

Your thyroid is your body’s silent workhorse—most of the time, it functions so smoothly that we forget it’s there. But this little, butterfly-shaped gland that sits at the base of your neck helps regulate your metabolism, temperature, heartbeat, and more, and if it starts to go haywire, you’ll notice. An underactive thyroid—when the gland fails to produce enough thyroid hormone (TH)—can bring on weight gain, sluggishness, depression, and increased sensitivity to cold. An overactive thyroid, on the other hand, happens when your body produces too much TH, and can cause sudden weight loss, irregular heartbeat, sweating, nervousness, and irritability.

Genetics, an autoimmune condition, stress, and environmental toxins can all mess with your thyroid—and so can your diet, one factor you can completely control. Here are the foods that may help keep your thyroid humming along, as well as some that won’t.

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seaweed

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Best: Seaweed

Your thyroid needs iodine to work properly and produce enough TH for your body’s needs. Don’t get enough iodine, and you run the risk of hypothyroidism or a goiter (a thyroid gland that becomes enlarged to make up for the shortage of thyroid hormone). Most Americans have no problem getting enough iodine, since table salt is iodized—but if you’re on a low-sodium diet (as an increasing number of Americans are for their heart health) or follow a vegan diet (more on that later), then you may need to up your intake from other sources.

Many types of seaweed are chockfull of iodine, but the amount can vary wildly, says Mira Ilic, RD, a registered dietician at the Cleveland Clinic. According to the National Institutes of Health, a 1-gram portion can contain anywhere from 11% to a whopping 1,989% of your percent daily value. But since seaweed is especially high in iodine, you shouldn’t start eating sushi every day of the week. Too muchiodine can be just as harmful to your thyroid as too little by triggering (or worsening) hypothyroidism. To get seaweed’s big benefits without going overboard, Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, and Health’s contributing nutrition editor advises sticking to one fresh seaweed salad per week (in addition to sushi), and steering clear of seaweed teas and supplements.

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